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Here are Some Tips on How to Succeed on Your First Day at a New IT Company

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Here are Some Tips on How to Succeed on Your First Day at a New IT Company

Congratulations on your new job! You deserve to celebrate your hard work in reaching this milestone. It’s difficult to predict what will happen when you start a new job. It will be a new environment with new people and new responsibilities for you. Some useful tips such as you should run a speed test by typing “MySpeedCheck” on google or entering the URL https://myspeedcheck.net. Many other tips will also assist you in preparing for your new job. It doesn’t matter what kind of job you’ve secured, and there are always things you can (and should) do at the workplace. 

So without wasting time. Let’s dive in!

Prepare Yourself Before Arriving

Have you started at a new job? Here’s what you need to know. Before the event, be proactive. To get you onboarded, human resources may require documentation. Approximately a week before your start date, contact the person you have been in touch with most. Such as your new manager or HR representative, and inquire what needs to be provided.

What to bring on your first day of work: 

  • Identification. Documents such as a driver’s license, passport, Social Security card, or birth certificate can be presented. Find out if more than one form of identification is required. Using a scanner may be necessary if you send a copy via email, but a close-up camera photo may suffice.
  • Money. You might need it for coffee runs or lunch meetings during your first day with your new co-workers.
  • A blank check or banking information. Human resources might ask for this information to set up direct deposit for your paychecks. 
  • A fully charged cell phone and watch: You might not have easy access when you need a computer or clock. Keep track of your time to avoid missing any meetings on your first day.
  • Notepad and pen. Whether physical or electronic, this can be of any kind. You will likely need to jot down important information about your job, the names of your colleagues, or ideas you need to remember.
  • A good work-from-home setup. Testing your video-call setup is essential if you telecommute. Run a Speedtest by searching “MySpeedCheck” on the google search engine to ensure your Wi-Fi is working well. Don’t forget to plug in any lamps or lights you may need the night before.

The best preparation for the first day would be mentally preparing for it. Knowing the names of your manager, colleagues, department heads, and the chief executive is essential.

Discover Your Orbit

Look around and see whom you can help and who can help you. ” You might provide the team with the extra boost of energy it needs or fill a subject matter expertise gap,” 

As you meet your co-workers, do the following:

  • Establish communication boundaries. Your manager is the best person to start with. Communicate with them according to their preferred style. For example, would they prefer you hop on short calls when a question arises, or would they prefer you save up all your questions for a weekly meeting? You will save yourself time in the future by doing this.
  • Ask all the questions. Feel free to ask about the organization’s culture or the Wi-Fi password if you need it. “As a newbie, you’ve got an excuse for asking all these questions.”
  • Balance tasks and relationships. Instead of focusing solely on HR tasks, prioritize developing relationships with your colleagues. 

Be Authentic When Starting a New Job

It is still helpful to be your authentic self at work, even if you prefer to keep your personal and professional lives separate. Although you may need to adjust slightly for a professional setting, being yourself allows you to establish stronger relationships with your colleagues. You may be interested in acting more authentically at work, and it’s helpful to avoid these mistakes so you can express yourself.

  • Overbooking: Make sure your schedule is flexible enough to accommodate unplanned meetings. Consider this tactic as going to the doctor during flu season. “Doctors don’t completely book their schedules because these professionals know they have to accommodate walk-ins. “We don’t think about all those other little things that pop up throughout the day.”
  • Speaking more than listening: “Seek first to understand, then to comprehend.” Successful communication relies heavily on active listening.
  • Burning out:  New employees often feel pressured to be the first ones online, like they’re not allowed to take a full lunch break, or they have to work late into the evening to prove themselves, which can be intolerable.”

Conclusion

If you are a newbie at your office, you should have to follow some of the tips, such as you need to keep your internet speed fast. So, you have to run a speed test. All you have to do is to search “MySpeedCheck” on the search engine. Furthermore, there are many other tips to follow to succeed on your first day at a new company.

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Twitter pulls paid verification after impersonators flourish

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Twitter pulls paid verification after impersonators flourish

The sudden absence of the service adds to a series of whiplash product moves in the two weeks Musk has controlled the company.

Twitter has suspended subscriptions to its Blue subscription service after the initial launch was marred by users receiving a paid verification badge and then impersonating celebrities, politicians and brands.

Twitter users started noticing a change Thursday night when the blue subscribe option was no longer in the app’s sidebar. The Twitter Blue registration page still points to a page with information about the service, but without the ability to register.

It was not immediately clear if service would be restored and when.

The sudden absence of the service, which CEO Elon Musk called a major step as Twitter seeks to increase revenue and reduce the prevalence of bots and trolls, was the result of a series of product moves in the two weeks that Musk controlled the business. .

A Twitter sales official said the company decided to remove the verified service from Twitter Blue after several accounts started impersonating businesses using accounts with paid verification badges that looked just like the original Twitter.Twitter confirmation badges for public figures and famous brands.

Even Elon Musk’s other company, electric car maker Tesla, has failed to protect Twitter from brand-degrading copycats.

The employee, who asked to remain anonymous for fear of retaliation, said the account, set up under the guise of pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly, caused a particularly serious problem on Thursday, when he tweeted: “We are pleased to announce that insulin is now available for free.”

The tweet went viral and stayed on social media for at least two hours before being deleted. The real Eli Lilly account later tweeted, “We apologize to those who received a misleading message from a fake Lilly account.”

Eli Lilly’s stock price plummeted after the fake tweet was posted, as did shares in other pharmaceutical companies, including AbbVie, which was also given away. Major stock indices were broadly positive on Thursday, with the S&P 500 posting its biggest rally in two years.

Internal messages obtained by CNBC show that Twitter support initially determined that a tweet impersonating Eli Lilly did not violate the company’s terms of service. The seller said they encourage customers to tweet directly to Elon Musk about their concerns.

Twitter has also reintroduced a new “Official” badge for some accounts. The company confirmed the news on one of its Twitter accounts.

The Twitter Blue Verified recall also comes as the company’s new management is considering how to comply with FTC oversight, according to company-wide emails sent to employees Thursday night and obtained by CNBC.

Twitter is currently under an FTC consent decree that requires, among other things, to notify the agency of new products with a written plan.

Some employees expressed doubts about Musk’s willingness to comply with FTC supervision. Earlier in the week, internal communications on a company message board, seen by NBC news, showed that employees were concerned that Twitter’s new leaders would ask them to do work that might involve a violation. of the consent decree, or any other. laws and regulations.

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DUBAI INVESTMENTS REPORTS A 227% SURGE IN NET PROFIT

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DUBAI INVESTMENTS REPORTS A 227% SURGE IN NET PROFIT

Dubai Investments, a leading diversified investment firm listed on the Dubai Financial Market, reported net income of AED 1,489 million for the period ended September 30, 2022, up 227% from AED 456 million for the nine-month period . . last year.

Profits of AED 1,033 million were higher year on year, mainly due to gains from the sale of a 50% majority stake and an increase in the fair value of the remaining AED 980 investment in Emirates District Cooling (Emicool) LLC. Millions The Group’s production, works and services segment also showed good results. Total Group revenue increased to AED 3.3 billion compared to AED 2.6 billion for the nine months ended September 30, 2022, compared to the same period last year.

Khalid Bin Kalban, Vice President and CEO of Dubai Investments, said: “The group has maintained momentum this year and delivered strong results, reflecting the resilience of the business model.

This quarter’s exceptional results are the result of a significant value discovery through an organized sale process that demonstrates Dubai Investments’ value creation strategy. In line with the Group’s strategy of offering greater returns to shareholders, an interim dividend of 7.5% was approved for the quarter. The Group is focused on taking the appropriate steps related to strategic investments and will complete its planned exit from mature assets in the coming years.”

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Project aims to boost ag tech through improved field connectivity

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Project aims to boost ag tech through improved field connectivity

Many farmers and agricultural experts see digital farming tech AS improved field connectivity. Managing farms using sensors, drones and robots, artificial intelligence, advanced data analytics and more will be key to efficiently feeding the world’s increasing population, expected to reach 10 billion by 2050.

But maximizing agricultural technology’s potential hinges on a tool that most fields lack: high-speed internet connectivity.

An interdisciplinary Nebraska research team, led by computer engineer Mehmet Can Vuran, is trying to change that fact. The team includes Shuai Nie, Qiang Liu, Christos Argyropoulos, Yufeng Ge and Santosh Pitla. With a three-year, $1 million grant from the National Science Foundation, the team is designing a next-generation wireless network for agricultural fields that would catalyze an array of digital farming technologies and buoy the businesses of countless farmers. Currently, at least two-thirds of farmers say they lack sufficient internet connectivity to run their operations, and 25% of U.S. farms do not have internet at all.

“We have started to redesign the wireless network according to the constraints and requirements of agricultural fields,” said Vuran, Jensen Chair and professor of computing. “Right now, the best farmers and researchers can do is grab wireless technologies from whatever is available in nearby urban environments. They try to use Wi-Fi or existing cellular connections, which were not designed for the field. This is like trying to fit a square peg into a round hole.”

It’s a mismatch because the two environments are vastly different. Urban connectivity leverages the vertical infrastructure inherent to cities: tall buildings, streetlights and traffic lights house the necessary equipment. Agricultural fields lack this robust vertical infrastructure, making it much more difficult to build a network.

Additionally, agricultural fields are subjected to harsh environmental and weather conditions that can interrupt wireless connections. The type of crop, its stage of growth and even a plant’s moisture content can also affect signals. Vuran’s group is devising a wireless architecture called Field-Nets to address these challenges.

A cornerstone of their approach is deployment of millimeter wave technology on farms. This technology, increasingly used to support 5G connections in urban areas, sends signals on a bandwidth of the radio-frequency spectrum that is not overcrowded. Plentiful bandwidth means signal transmission is fast, at gigabits per second, with minimal disruption.

Last summer, Vuran’s group conducted some of the first-ever experiments of millimeter wave technology in agricultural fields. These studies showed how easily corn and soybean growth can impact these delicate, high-frequency signals, whose wavelength size is just millimeters long. The resulting datasets are publicly available to help other researchers and practitioners. With the NSF funding, Vuran’s team will develop the computer processing abilities and complex algorithms necessary to support robust and reliable connections.

Another key strategy of Field-Nets is edge computing: a type of networking architecture that shifts computation and data storage closer to the data sources. Because rural environments lack what’s called backhaul — the high-speed connections between a remote site and the core network — cloud computing is a challenge. This is problematic because in the future, precision farming devices are likely to generate as much data as a typical city environment.

Vuran’s solution is to push processing to the “edge” of the network, which in this case means moving it to the farm. When a farm’s robots, sensors and other devices produce data streams, they will be processed and stored on-site, protecting farmers’ data privacy.

The team is also ensuring the Field-Nets infrastructure only uses the spectrum when and where it’s needed. Although there is currently abundant spectrum available in rural areas, this will change as digital farming gains momentum. A crowded spectrum could thwart rural residents’ ability to use the internet – creating a digital divide between farms and the towns next door.

“We are designing with the understanding of this potential divide from the beginning. We need to adopt advanced spectrum sharing solutions from scratch,” Vuran said. “We don’t want to have to go back and redesign spectrum sharing solutions later, which has been done in some urban environments. We’re learning from that history.”

The project advances Vuran’s longer-term research mission, which is to bridge the original digital divide: the gap between urban and rural areas. Of the 24 million Americans who lack high-speed internet, 80% live in rural areas. As society increasingly relies on digital tools, the gap in internet access exacerbates gaps in prosperity, education, health care and more.

The work represents an increasingly important merger between computing and agriculture. To maintain its position at the forefront of ag innovation, Husker researchers are prioritizing enhanced partnerships between these two disciplines.

“Computer scientists and agricultural engineers will have to work together more and more, and this is one of the first funded projects representing this joining of hands,” said Pitla, associate professor of biological systems engineering.

Pitla, an expert in agricultural robotics, has been developing small autonomous robots that plant seeds and apply fertilizers since he joined the university in 2014. Although the technology can work without connectivity, a reliable wireless infrastructure would unleash the robots’ full potential: They could communicate with each other or summon a drone for a supply refill.

“Connectivity solutions could really amplify what we do and catalyze and facilitate a lot of things, especially with logistics and operational efficiency,” he said.

The research group will test the Field-Nets infrastructure using Pitla’s technology.

The project includes partnerships with members of Nebraska’s agricultural community, farmers and industry members, and will enable Husker students to train in a highly interdisciplinary environment.

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